Monday, September 16th 2019

S3 Episode 30 Flaws in the system

Join me as I interview the brilliant Dr. Jodi Flaws of the University of Illinois on her research on how phthalates affect the female reproductive system. I’m grateful for the research on how endocrine disrupting chemicals affect kids… but not enough folks seem to center their research on direct effects of women. Learn about what our cosmetics, toys, and food contain, how to reduce exposure to these chemicals, and the kinds of effects these chemicals have on our menstrual cycles, menopausal symptoms, and more.

I was lucky to just have to bike a few miles for this interview, because we work at the same university. I’m also lucky enough to get to have lunch with Jodi about once a month as part of a women faculty mentoring group. Dr. Flaws is a Professor in Comparative Biosciences at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois. Dr. Flaws’ research program is mainly focused on determining the mechanisms by which environmental chemicals affect the development and function of the ovary. Her research is funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health and Environmental Protection Agency.  She has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers that have involved extensive participation and authorship by graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, veterinary medical students, and undergraduate students.  She is the recipient of the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland Student Mentoring Award, the Patricia Sokolove Outstanding Mentor Award, the Dr. Gordon and Mrs. Helen Kruger Research Excellence Award, the Pfizer Animal Health Award for Research Excellence, the University Scholar Award, the Women in Toxicology Mentoring Award from the Society of Toxicology, and the Society for the Study of Reproduction Trainee Mentor Award.


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Subscribe to PERIOD so you don’t miss an episode! Subscribing, especially on Apple Podcasts, helps us a ton with promoting the podcast and getting the word out to more people. So does leaving a review, so please do that too!

Call or write me! I am collecting two things right now: your period questions, and first period stories. Leave me a voicemail with either or both at 262-PERIOD-2 (262-737-4632). Don’t forget to tell me how to contact you if you don’t mind my following up.

Other ways to contact me:

I can’t wait to hear what you think! Thanks for listening!

Direct download: here

Permalink: here



Monday, September 9th 2019

S3 Episode 29 Myths and Disturbances


Show notes:  The mother of menstrual cycle research is here! I spoke with Dr. Jerilynn Prior, one of my personal heroines, about her early and more recent work on menstrual cycles, perimenopause, and estrogen. Dr. Prior made several important interventions in clinical research on the menstrual cycle, asking: Why are we comparing two groups of women who are so different, then blaming all those differences on physical activity? Why are we acting as though physical activity is so damaging to fertility? And, why do we do so little to translate this work to the menstruators who so desperately need it?

Jerilynn C. Prior BA, MD, FRCPC (former ABIM, ABEM) is a Professor of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC. She has spent her career studying menstrual cycle and the effects of the cycle’s changing estrogen and progesterone hormone levels on women’s health. She is the founder (2002) and Scientific Director of the Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research (CeMCOR). CeMCOR is actively researching women’s health and has a very accessible, informative website. I especially recommend the pages on several common conditions that affect menstruators, most especially her page on perimenopause as well as heavy or unusual menstrual bleeding.

Dr. Jerilynn Prior

Do you want to be a patron, or is there someone in your life who would want to be? Check out my Patreon page for ways to support this podcast. Help me make beautiful things!

Want a better PERIOD?

Subscribe to PERIOD so you don’t miss an episode! Subscribing, especially on iTunes, helps us a ton with promoting the podcast and getting the word out to more people. So does leaving a review, so please do that too!

Call or write me! I am collecting two things right now: your period questions, and first period stories. Leave me a voicemail with either or both at 262-PERIOD-2 (262-737-4632). Don’t forget to tell me how to contact you if you don’t mind my following up.

Other ways to contact me:

I can’t wait to hear what you think! Thanks for listening!

Direct download: here

Permalink: here



Wednesday, September 4th 2019

S3 Episode 28 Iron Man…struators

Show notes:  Join me as I nerd out with anthropologist Dr. Elizabeth Miller as we talk about iron stores, iron deficiency, and all the ways menstruators are pathologized for bleeding.

Elizabeth Miller is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of South Florida. She is interested in how iron metabolism evolved with women’s reproduction and the health consequences of this for women around the world.

Dr. Elizabeth Miller

Do you want to be a patron, or is there someone in your life who would want to be? Check out my Patreon page for ways to support this podcast. Help me make beautiful things!

Want a better PERIOD?

Subscribe to PERIOD so you don’t miss an episode! Subscribing, especially on iTunes, helps us a ton with promoting the podcast and getting the word out to more people. So does leaving a review, so please do that too!

Call or write me! I am collecting two things right now: your period questions, and first period stories. Leave me a voicemail with either or both at 262-PERIOD-2 (262-737-4632). Don’t forget to tell me how to contact you if you don’t mind my following up.

Other ways to contact me:

I can’t wait to hear what you think! Thanks for listening!

Direct download: here

Permalink: here